i will die in peace

Vintage Tumblr Themes
i will die in peace

ifiwasabird-idflyaway:

Giant’s Causeway, County Antrim, N. Ireland. (via 500px / Bloody Causeway by Michael Breitung)

ifiwasabird-idflyaway:

Giant’s Causeway, County Antrim, N. Ireland. (via 500px / Bloody Causeway by Michael Breitung)

minutemanworld:

Dr. Joseph Warren’s medical account book. 

minutemanworld:

Dr. Joseph Warren’s medical account book. 

crazyredcoat:

Centre Company Officer, Royal Welch Fusiliers by unknown artist, c.1742 (?)

crazyredcoat:

Centre Company Officer, Royal Welch Fusiliers by unknown artist, c.1742 (?)

gentlemaninkhaki:

"Cornet Thomas Boothby Parkyns, 15th Light Dragoons" by John Boultbee, 1780

gentlemaninkhaki:

"Cornet Thomas Boothby Parkyns, 15th Light Dragoons" by John Boultbee, 1780

bantarleton:

Richard Bennett Lloyd by Benjamin West, 1st Foot Guards 1770’s-1780’s

bantarleton:

Richard Bennett Lloyd by Benjamin West, 1st Foot Guards 1770’s-1780’s

peashooter85:

A lovely Italian blunderbuss, circa 1730.
Sold at Auction:  £13,200 (US$ 21,973)

peashooter85:

A lovely Italian blunderbuss, circa 1730.

Sold at Auction:  £13,200 (US$ 21,973)

thesixthduke:

historysquee:

Coffin of the Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey, 1920
This photograph shows the coffin of the unknown warrior, resting in Westminster Abbey before burial. The idea of the Grave of the Unknown Warrior was to commemorate all the dead who had fallen in the First World War. No one knows the identity of the soldier in the coffin. On the 7th November 1920, several bodies were exhumed from different battle sites such as the Somme, Ypres and Cambai. The bodies were laid out covered with Union Flags and Brigadier General L. J. Wyatt picked one body at random at midnight. The body was then placed in a coffin and shipped back to England in great ceremony, whilst the other bodies were carefully reburied.
The body was taken in a gun carriage drawn by six black horses, to Westminster Abbey on 11th November. On the way to the Abbey, the soldier stopped at the unveiling of the Cenotaph at Whitehall and so was present during the ceremony. The soldier was buried with soil samples of various battlefields and George V placed some French soil onto the coffin at the end of the ceremony. The ceremony was carried on simultaneously with the burial of another unknown soldier in France at the Arc de Triomphe. The unknown soldier remains a strong symbol of all war dead to this day, and is the only tomb in Westminster Abbey that people are not allowed to walk across. 

Such a hauntingly beautiful photograph.

thesixthduke:

historysquee:

Coffin of the Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey, 1920

This photograph shows the coffin of the unknown warrior, resting in Westminster Abbey before burial. The idea of the Grave of the Unknown Warrior was to commemorate all the dead who had fallen in the First World War. No one knows the identity of the soldier in the coffin. On the 7th November 1920, several bodies were exhumed from different battle sites such as the Somme, Ypres and Cambai. The bodies were laid out covered with Union Flags and Brigadier General L. J. Wyatt picked one body at random at midnight. The body was then placed in a coffin and shipped back to England in great ceremony, whilst the other bodies were carefully reburied.

The body was taken in a gun carriage drawn by six black horses, to Westminster Abbey on 11th November. On the way to the Abbey, the soldier stopped at the unveiling of the Cenotaph at Whitehall and so was present during the ceremony. The soldier was buried with soil samples of various battlefields and George V placed some French soil onto the coffin at the end of the ceremony. The ceremony was carried on simultaneously with the burial of another unknown soldier in France at the Arc de Triomphe. The unknown soldier remains a strong symbol of all war dead to this day, and is the only tomb in Westminster Abbey that people are not allowed to walk across. 

Such a hauntingly beautiful photograph.

jeannepompadour:

Man’s silk sleeved waistcoat, c. 1715

jeannepompadour:

Man’s silk sleeved waistcoat, c. 1715

jaded-mandarin:

Thomas Gainsborough. Portrait of a Woman, 1750.

jaded-mandarin:

Thomas Gainsborough. Portrait of a Woman, 1750.


Title Portrait of a Lady, Detail
Artist: Anonymous (Italy)
Description: This unidentified, fashionably dressed lady wishes to be represented, above all, as a student of ancient culture. On the table next to a sheet of music is a cabinet with casts of ancient carved gems, which were often collected along with-or instead of-the actual gems; for the serious student, even one such as the sitter who is armed with a magnifying glass, casts bring out details that hard to see in the original carving. Also, they could be duplicated as a set for those with scholarly interests but without the means to acquire the originals. In addition, the lady wears a portrait miniature of a gentleman (her deceased husband, father, or teacher?). The portrait is painted in the new neoclassical style, which emphasizes clearly delineated forms.
Date: between circa 1780 and circa 1789 (Baroque)

Title Portrait of a Lady, Detail

Artist: Anonymous (Italy)

Description: This unidentified, fashionably dressed lady wishes to be represented, above all, as a student of ancient culture. On the table next to a sheet of music is a cabinet with casts of ancient carved gems, which were often collected along with-or instead of-the actual gems; for the serious student, even one such as the sitter who is armed with a magnifying glass, casts bring out details that hard to see in the original carving. Also, they could be duplicated as a set for those with scholarly interests but without the means to acquire the originals. In addition, the lady wears a portrait miniature of a gentleman (her deceased husband, father, or teacher?). The portrait is painted in the new neoclassical style, which emphasizes clearly delineated forms.

Date: between circa 1780 and circa 1789 (Baroque)

crazyredcoat:

“The Relief”, by Henry Bunbury, circa 1781

crazyredcoat:

“The Relief”, by Henry Bunbury, circa 1781

criminalwisdom:

UNDERTAKER’S BUSINESS CARD FROM THE 18th CENTURY»

Undertaker’s trade card from 1745 labeled “The sign of the Naked Boy and Coffin.”
Text reads: “At ye lower Corner of Fleet Lane at ye Signe of ye Naked Boy & Coffin you may be Accommodated wth all things for a Funeral as well ye meanest as those of greater Ability upon Reasonable Terms more particularly Coffins Shrouds Palls Cloaks Sconces Stans Hangings for Rooms Heraldry Hearse & Coaches Gloves wth all other things not here mentioned by Wm.Grinly Coffin Maker.” (Via)

(Source: Nerdcore)

criminalwisdom:

UNDERTAKER’S BUSINESS CARD FROM THE 18th CENTURY»

Undertaker’s trade card from 1745 labeled “The sign of the Naked Boy and Coffin.”

Text reads: “At ye lower Corner of Fleet Lane at ye Signe of ye Naked Boy & Coffin you may be Accommodated wth all things for a Funeral as well ye meanest as those of greater Ability upon Reasonable Terms more particularly Coffins Shrouds Palls Cloaks Sconces Stans Hangings for Rooms Heraldry Hearse & Coaches Gloves wth all other things not here mentioned by Wm.Grinly Coffin Maker.” (Via)

(Source: Nerdcore)

crazyredcoat:

Redcoat on Flickr

crazyredcoat:

Redcoat on Flickr